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A suit of armor

 "Nobody want's to read blogs these days, people don't care what your opinion is". This is a frequent comment on the subject of blogging. For most of us and certainly for myself, it is a form of release, it is to undress. We bloggers write, not to confirm our opinions, but to release them. It's like letting loose a caged bird - where it alights is irrelevant. We add real content to the web unlike the advertisers and corporations that fuzzy our cloudy minds with 'Flashy' websites. We put our lives out there in a global database of observations and emotions.

Think of it as a crusade, we battle the foe and our enemy is the shallow belief that being connected on a social network is more important than what we're connected to. This goes to the very core of Google's recent China action, it is NOT just about connection, it's about transparency. If we search in a world that is plagued by denial, what is it we will find, even more denial. The Netherlands is a society dominated by denial. If one has a problem your Dutch friend will more often than not use it as an opportunity to give you pragmatic advise, all-the-while confirming to themselves how well balanced their own life must surely be. Difficulties are are to be avoided by analytical assessment. A solution found and applied. The waters are kept at bay...phew. A new self-help book is on the way.

But you see if we really are to put up with ourselves or put ourselves out there in a blog we need to realize how much denial surrounds us. To recall a Buddhist teacher, "we dawn our suit of steal armor even before we leave the house in the morning". Cocooned we meet the world, protected in a false security called ego. We hide our weaknesses instead of celebrating them.

When we blog we shouldn't be afraid to show our frailty, we shouldn't be afraid to show our emotion, to strip off our suit of armor. We should not be surprised that some will look at our confusions and think better of themselves for it. Just put it out there, just blog and be done with it. I guarantee you will feel better and in time, be better.

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