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Where now?

I've been busy of late cleaning up my web presence. For my work I help people with their websites, so unfortunately my own web stuff gets neglected. I began this blog to improve my writing, learn more about blogging, show some photography, and communicate with people internationally. Overtime, it became somewhat fragmented.

Perhaps most beneficial, was that it served as therapy, scribbling down my anxieties as an Irishman living amongst Dutch Calvinists. Looking back in black and white helped. So where now? I have a website for my work which includes a blog, I have a youtube channel dedicated to my passion for pipe smoking, and I think I should leave it that way. Like my Dutch brothers, I will segregate and compartmentalize more.

So where does DubintheDam take us now? The title clearly states, "A Dublinman in Amsterdam". That is the narrative. The language of that story has often been too angry, but Dutch society still continues a slippery slide too far right xenophobia. There is more reason than ever, to be pissed. A good friend who shares many of the same insights, says, 'Pearse, you're a really funny guy, you should use your humor more with the Cloggies.'

So I hereby pledge to be funnier, to steer the ship back on course. I will continue to ridicule  xenophobia, as the laughable thing that it is. I will bravely venture into that 'Comedy of Errors' which is Dutch politics. I will assure my fellow ex-pats: 'no you're not going nuts...they really are unbelievable'. I will tell more about Amsterdam which is a great city, about Amsterdamer's too, who are immensely more international than their cousins from the pollder. And I will add more Blarney, lashings of it, promise.


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